IEEE Transactions on
Biomedical Engineering

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.
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Xiaochuan Pan
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-chief

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for... Read more

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for conventional and spectral computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT), and tomosynthesis especially digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital lung tomosynthesis (DLT). In collaborating with leading researchers in the field, he and his team have worked on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have also investigated emerging imaging techniques, including electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), phase-contrast CT, and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), among others. In recent years, he and his team have developed vigorous interest/effort in translating theoretical concepts and methods to biomedical application work that includes developing innovative hardware systems and workflows, enabled by advanced algorithms, with a strong emphasis on the relevance and impact of imaging technological solutions tailored to specific applications of biomedical and/or clinical significance, and have established continuous, close clinical and industrial collaboration and developed robust translational projects to facilitate this effort. Dr. Pan is a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE."

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Featured Articles

IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

MAY 2020
VOLUME 67
NUMBER 5
IEBEAX
67
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, Volume 67, Issue 5
Combined Single Cell Manipulation and Chemomechanical Modeling to Probe Cell Migration Mechanism during Cell-to-cell Interaction
During cell-to-cell interaction, spatial presentations of chemical and mechanical information are key parameters for cell migration. A chemomechanical model to assess the biochemical and biophysical modulators of single cell migration during cell-to-cell interaction can help to understand cell migration in a complex environment that is close to realistic in vivo situation. In the work, the issue is modeled based on molecular clutches, and experiment validation is implemented through single cell manipulation through optical tweezers. The results show that cell migration velocity caused by chemotaxis can be biased by dynamic adhesion force between cells... Read more
CMOS-compatible, Flexible, Intracortical Neural Probes
Flexible intracortical neural probes elicit a lower tissue response compared to rigid implants. However, silicon-based neural probes incorporating complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry offer improved scalability and functionality. We describe a novel neural implant combining short, needle-like CMOS-based probe tips with flexible polyimide cables. Ultra-thin shuttles enable their complete implantation into brain tissue. An optimized cable fabrication process based on ion beam and plasma etching increases line and pad density, thus minimizing the bond area between cable and probe tip to widths of 100 µm. The synergetic approach surpasses the limitations of each individual probe technology and should be considered in future developments... Read more
Enhanced detection of bubble emissions through the intact spine for monitoring ultrasound-mediated blood-spinal cord barrier opening
Short burst, phase keying (SBPK) is a clinically relevant pulse scheme for focused ultrasound delivery to the spinal canal. We demonstrate that emissions from microbubbles exposed to these pulses can be detected through ex vivo human vertebrae, and that SBPK exposures can open the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) in rats. Microbubbles were sonicated through ex vivo vertebrae and emissions were analyzed using short time Fourier analysis. Pulses were modified to include pulse inversion, which enhanced detection of acoustic signatures. In rats, opening was confirmed by MRI enhancement. Detection of the subharmonic was linked to tissue damage observed at histology... Read more
A multiscale agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States, and about 17% of these occur within the mammary gland duct, known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We have developed a multiscale, lattice-free agent-based model of DCIS, incorporating both molecular and cellular scales, to study how phenotypic and signaling changes influence the key early stages of disease development. By simulating the effects of bidirectional feedback between these scales, we have gained valuable insights into how this complex interplay affects disease progression, and have identified key processes that may be optimal prognostic indicators of future disease advancement... Read more
An Automated Microrobotic Platform for Rapid Detection of C. diff Toxins
Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection is a serious public health threat, and early diagnosis of this toxin-mediated disease is important. This paper presents a fluorescence imaging-integrated microrobotic system and related methods for automated and rapid detection of C. diff toxins. The automated mobile detection process finishes within 20 minutes, and then qualitative and semi-quantitative results are immediately given. This process is at least 8 times shorter than that of the conventional ELISA. The proposed microrobotic platform offers an automated, rapid and low-cost C. diff toxin detection technique that has good competency for future clinical use... Read more