IEEE Transactions on
Biomedical Engineering

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.
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Xiaochuan Pan
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-chief

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for... Read more

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for conventional and spectral computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT), and tomosynthesis especially digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital lung tomosynthesis (DLT). In collaborating with leading researchers in the field, he and his team have worked on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have also investigated emerging imaging techniques, including electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), phase-contrast CT, and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), among others. In recent years, he and his team have developed vigorous interest/effort in translating theoretical concepts and methods to biomedical application work that includes developing innovative hardware systems and workflows, enabled by advanced algorithms, with a strong emphasis on the relevance and impact of imaging technological solutions tailored to specific applications of biomedical and/or clinical significance, and have established continuous, close clinical and industrial collaboration and developed robust translational projects to facilitate this effort. Dr. Pan is a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE."

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Featured Articles

IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

AUGUST 2020
VOLUME 67
NUMBER 8
IEBEAX
67
TBME, Volume 67, Issue 8, August 2020
Evaluation of Secrecy Capacity for Next-Generation Leadless Cardiac Pacemakers
Cardiac pacemakers are implanted medical devices designed to regulate abnormal cardiac rhythms. In the case of traditional pacemakers, the leads are considered to be the weakest link. This study proposes the keyless physical layer security (PLS) method to provide information confidentiality for next-generation leadless cardiac pacemakers. Electromagnetic simulations and experimental measurements were performed to prove the hypothesis of the availability of positive secrecy capacity in the near proximity of the human body. The research also evaluates the insecure volume in three-dimensional space around the body representing all the eavesdropper positions from which the pacemaker can be eavesdropped... Read more
Automated In Vivo Navigation of Magnetic-Driven Microrobots Using OCT Imaging Feedback
This paper presents a study on the navigation of microrobots in vivo by using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging feedback. The electromagnetic gradient field generated by a home-made electromagnetic manipulation system is magnetically modeled. With this model, the magnetic force acting on the microrobot is calculated, and the relationship between this force and the velocity of the microrobot is characterized. The findings are verified by the in vitro and in vivo environments, with the imaging feedback of the OCT imaging system and the actuation of the electromagnetic manipulation system. Experimental results have successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach... Read more
Design of Ceramic Packages for Ultrasonically Coupled Implantable Medical Devices
Ultrasonic power transfer has emerged as an efficient method for powering and communicating with small and deeply implanted medical devices. However, most work utilizing ultrasonically-coupled implants relies on non-hermetic polymeric encapsulation materials rather than conventional metal or ceramic packaging materials due to the inherent acoustic impedance mismatch of metals and ceramics. Here, we develop models of ultrasonic power transfer through metals, examining flexural and bulk mode propagation, to determine optimal package design for ultrasonic power transfer. We utilize these results to build millimeter-scale hybrid ceramic/metal packages, and perform benchtop demonstrations of ultrasonic powering and communication with a packaged electrophysiology sensor... Read more
Toward a High-Throughput Wireless Smart Arena for Behavioral Experiments on Small Animals
We present a high-throughput wirelessly-powered and scalable smart arena for conducting behavioral experiments on freely behaving animals like rodents. It is made of multiple units known as EnerCage, operating in parallel, and fits in standard racks used in animal facilities. The multi-EnerCage-Homecage (mEHC) system increases the volume of data collected from more animals, while lowering the cost and duration of experiments. It is equipped with an auto-tuning mechanism to compensate for the resonance-frequency shifts caused by displacement of adjacent homecages. A 7-units prototype of the mEHC system is implemented and the effects of interference and resonance-frequency bifurcation are minimized... Read more
Visual Servoed Robotic Mouse Oocyte Rotation
Both injection and biopsy of a mammalian cell require positioning and orientation of a biological cell in a three-dimensional space under a microscope. Manual cell manipulation and orientation is the most commonly used method that is based on a trial-and-error and direct cell poking approach. We present a system that is able to automatically rotate a mouse oocyte to a desired orientation based on pressure control and computer vision. Our methods improve existing techniques and provide a starting point for fast autofocusing and oocyte orientation prior to automatic ICSI or cell biopsy... Read more