Developing Antibody Defenses
Long before the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began, four research groups—two at universities and two at biotechnology companies—were preparing for it by tackling a seemingly outlandish challenge proffered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Department of Defense: find a stopgap defense against emerging pathogens, so people would have protection until a longer-term solution, notably a vaccine, became available... Read more

Tracking Sleep to Optimize Health
With the advent of wearable biometrictechnology like smart watches, “hacking” our bodies’ functions and cycles has become a tool in the never-ending quest for better health. And sleep is no exception. For example, a staggering one-third of Americans don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)... Read more
Rural Health Care for Coronavirus Requires Collaboration, Creativity
Before the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) started sweeping across the United States, it began on the coasts. The first known case was reported in a county just outside of Seattle, WA, with other cases quickly cropping up in California and in the greater New York City region... Read more
In a Pandemic, Technology Has Its Limits
If there’s one thing made abundantly clear as the pandemic rages on, it’s this: Technology alone can’t save us... Read more
IoMT (Internet of Medical Things): Reducing Cost While Improving Patient Care
Citizens’ dissatisfaction with the scope of the United States health care system has been a hot topic for many years. In a country where patient to nurse ratios remain 6:1, even universal health care coverage cannot guarantee adequate patient care... Read more
New, At-Home Antibody Test For Detecting, Tracking COVID-19
The test will be part of a large U.S. study to understand prevalence, post-infection immunity and potential lingering health impacts. An at-home test for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could be released commercially as early as August, according to Scanwell Health of... Read more
From Face-to-Face to FaceTime
In a Jetsons episode from 60 years ago, Elroy, the youngest Jetson, tries to get out of taking a space calculus test at school by telling his mom he’s sick. “I think I have Venus Virus,” he says. His mom doubts him, but summons a doctor anyway... Read more

EMBS Journal Updates

IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

NOVEMBER 2020
VOLUME 67
NUMBER 11
IEBEAX
67
TBME, Volume 67, Issue 11, November 2020
Tissue Structure Updating for In Situ Augmented Reality Navigation using Calibrated Ultrasound and Two-level Surface Warping
In minimally invasive surgery, in situ augmented reality (AR) navigation systems are usually implemented using a glasses-free 3D display to represent the preoperative tissue structure. However, due to changes in intraoperative tissue, the preoperative tissue structure is not able to exactly correspond to reality. To solve this problem, we propose a method to update the tissue structure for in situ AR navigation in such way to reflect changes in intraoperative tissue. Experiments confirm that the novel AR navigation system based on updating the tissue structure will open up a better approach to provide accurate 3D see-through guidance... Read more
Bio-Inspired Breastfeeding Simulator (BIBS): A Tool for Studying the Infant Feeding Mechanism
An experimental apparatus is developed for a better understanding of breastfeeding anomalies. This bio-inspired breastfeeding simulator (BIBS) mimics the infant’s complex suckling actions, including motions of the palate, tongue, and jaw, as well as sucking and vacuum pressure applied by the infant. BIBS includes a model of human breast, with a liquid mimicking the flow properties of milk, allowing external observations of flow. The design and construction of BIBS follows CT scanned images of the infants' oral cavities and clinical measurements and observations. This novel apparatus is the first to successfully mimic the compression and vacuum pressures exerted by infants... Read more

Pulse Ideas

State of the Art September/October 2020
Harmonicas
It is easy for me to imagine life without harmonicas, but for my parents’ generation, harmonicas were as common as rain. They were small and easy to fit in a shirt pocket or kit bag, and, whenever an idle moment presented itself, out came the harmonica to render a slightly reedy version of a well-known song: songs like “Red River Valley,” “You Are My Sunshine,” or “Tennessee Waltz.”... Read more
Retrospectroscope September/October 2020
Hearing Aid History: From Ear Trumpets to Digital Technology
It is said that time marches on, and one thing is certain: Hearing loss marches right along with it. The recorded history of hearing loss goes back hundreds of years, and attempts to correct hearing loss have been in existence since the very first person to cup a hand behind one ear... Read more
Book Reviews September/October 2020
Smartphone-Based Medical Diagnostics, 1st ed.
This reviewer has an interest in the use of smartphones for various tasks, such as documentation of device failures (photography), inspection of parts (use of borescopes), thermal imaging (attachments for infrared imaging), personal health monitoring (step counting, heart rate monitoring, stress monitoring), and the like... Read more
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