Natalie Mrachacz-Kersting

Natalie Mrachacz-Kersting received the Ph.D. degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Aalborg, Denmark, in 2005. She held several post-doctoral positions with the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and Aalborg University. Since 2007, she has been an Associate Professor with the Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Aalborg University. Her research focus involves the integration of neurophysiological and clinical research to evaluate neuromuscular control during walking in people with stroke. It is within this area that, she commenced brain–computer-interface research. Her research interests also include motor skill learning and training for musculoskeletal disorders. She has authored over 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals, over 100 conference papers/abstracts, and eight book chapters. In 2016, she was one of the recipients of the prestigious Innovation Grant in Denmark to pursue her research on BCI technology and its application in the real world.

Associated articles

TBME, Featured Articles
Decoding Covert Somatosensory Attention by a BCI System Calibrated With Tactile Sensation
Objective: We propose a novel calibration strategy to facilitate the decoding of covert somatosensory attention by exploring the oscillatory dynamics induced by tactile sensation. Methods: It was hypothesized that the similarity of the oscillatory pattern between stimulation sensation (SS, real... Read more
TNSRE, Featured Articles
Endogenous Sensory Discrimination and Selection by a Fast Brain Switch for a High Transfer Rate Brain-Computer Interface
In this study, we present a novel multi-class brain-computer interface (BCI) system for communication and control. In this system, the information processing is shared by the algorithm (computer) and the user (human). Specifically, an electro-tactile cycle was presented to the... Read more
TNSRE, Featured Articles
A Stimulus-Independent Hybrid BCI Based on Motor Imagery and Somatosensory Attentional Orientation
       Distinctive EEG signals from the motor and somatosensory cortex are generated during mental tasks of motor imagery (MI) and somatosensory attentional orientation (SAO). In this study, we hypothesize that a combination of these two signal modalities provides improvements in BCI... Read more
TNSRE, Featured Articles
Discriminative Manifold Learning Based Detection of Movement-Related Cortical Potentials
The detection of voluntary motor intention from EEG has been applied to closed-loop brain–computer interfacing (BCI). The movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) is a low frequency component of the EEG signal, which represents movement intention, preparation, and execution. In this study,... Read more