IEEE Transactions on
Biomedical Engineering

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.
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Xiaochuan Pan
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-chief

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for... Read more

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for conventional and spectral computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT), and tomosynthesis especially digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital lung tomosynthesis (DLT). In collaborating with leading researchers in the field, he and his team have worked on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have also investigated emerging imaging techniques, including electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), phase-contrast CT, and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), among others. In recent years, he and his team have developed vigorous interest/effort in translating theoretical concepts and methods to biomedical application work that includes developing innovative hardware systems and workflows, enabled by advanced algorithms, with a strong emphasis on the relevance and impact of imaging technological solutions tailored to specific applications of biomedical and/or clinical significance, and have established continuous, close clinical and industrial collaboration and developed robust translational projects to facilitate this effort. Dr. Pan is a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE."

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Featured Articles

TBME, Volume 69, Issue 6, June 2022
IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

JUNE 2022
VOLUME 69
NUMBER 6
IEBEAX
69
Performance Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Coupling Method for Intra-Body Network (IBNet)
The study presents magnetic resonance (MR) coupling as a promising method for the intra-body network (IBNet) by demonstrating effective signal transmission in the human body. A comparative performance evaluation revealed that the MR coupling exhibited a path loss (PL) of under 33 dB (at 13.56 MHz), which is lower than other methods (galvanic, capacitive, or RF). The angular orientation between the transmitter and receiver showed a minor variation (∆PL ≤ 0.62 dB) but moderate dependency on distance (0.05 dB/cm). Different postures did not affect the communication (∆PL ≤ 0.21 dB). Multi-nodal transmission using MR coupling also showed successful communication... Read more
A Novel Capsule-Delivered Enteric Drug-Injection Device for Delivery of Systemic Biologics: A Pilot Study in a Porcine Model
Here, we report a swallowable capsule for intestinal drug delivery (SCIDD) with the potential of directly injecting biological therapeutics into the small intestine wall. The design, optimization, and validation of the SCIDD's primary subsystems were performed both ex-vivo and in-vivo. The assembled capsule was further tested in vivo to validate the actuation sequence which showed a 70% success rate in an animal model. A drug delivery study indicated systemic uptake of adalimumab via SCIDD compared with luminal delivery in the small intestine. The pilot study presented here establishes that the novel platform could be used to orally deliver systemic biologics... Read more
Simultaneous localized brain mild hyperthermia and blood-brain barrier opening via feedback-controlled transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles
We present a synergistic focused ultrasound-based brain drug delivery method for both spatiotemporally precise transcranial mild hyperthermia and simultaneous localized blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. We demonstrated that with the presence of microbubbles, transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound mild hyperthermia can be achieved at significantly reduced powers and prolonged BBB opening can be simultaneously achieved with hyperthermia sonications in a rodent model. No structural abnormality, edema, hemorrhage, or acute microglial activation was observed in the target region via MR imaging and histology. This study provides a new strategy for enhanced drug delivery in brain tissues with a high clinical translation potential... Read more
Jet-Induced Tissue Disruption for Blood Release
Jet injectors use a high-speed fluid jet to pierce the skin, and can be used not only to deliver drugs, but also to release capillary blood, much like a lancet. This work provides new histological information about tissue disruption induced by a circular jet, a lancet-inspired slot-shaped jet, and a lancet prick. The slot-shaped jet caused shallower penetration with smaller wound volume but disrupted more vascular endothelium than the circular jet. The findings suggest that jet injection can be designed to release capillary blood in volumes similar to that of a lancet prick, and thus be useful in blood testing... Read more
Inverse Reinforcement Learning Intra-operative Path Planning for Steerable Needle
This work presents a safe and effective keyhole neurosurgery intra-operative planning framework for flexible neurosurgical robots. The framework is intended to support neurosurgeons during the intraoperative procedure to react to a dynamic environment. The proposed system integrates inverse reinforcement learning path planning algorithm, based on expert demonstrations, with a realistic, time-bounded simulator based on Position-based Dynamics simulation that mocks brain deformations due to catheter insertion and a simulated robotic system. Simulation results performed on a human brain dataset show that that the presented intra-operative steerable needle path planner is able to avoid anatomical obstacles while optimising surgical criteria... Read more