IEEE Transactions on
Biomedical Engineering

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.
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Xiaochuan Pan
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-chief

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for... Read more

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for conventional and spectral computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT), and tomosynthesis especially digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital lung tomosynthesis (DLT). In collaborating with leading researchers in the field, he and his team have worked on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have also investigated emerging imaging techniques, including electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), phase-contrast CT, and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), among others. In recent years, he and his team have developed vigorous interest/effort in translating theoretical concepts and methods to biomedical application work that includes developing innovative hardware systems and workflows, enabled by advanced algorithms, with a strong emphasis on the relevance and impact of imaging technological solutions tailored to specific applications of biomedical and/or clinical significance, and have established continuous, close clinical and industrial collaboration and developed robust translational projects to facilitate this effort. Dr. Pan is a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE."

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Featured Articles

TBME, Volume 68, Issue 11, November 2021
IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering
NOVEMBER 2021
VOLUME 68
NUMBER 11
IEBEAX
68
Integrated System for Bacterial Detection and Biofilm Treatment On Indwelling Urinary Catheters
This work aims to integrate a bacterial biofilm sensing and treatment system with a commercially available Foley urinary catheter for managing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). The system comprises a flexible impedance sensor seamlessly integrated with the inner catheter surface via a 3D-printed insert. The electrodes also apply a bioelectric effect-based treatment that provides a synergistic reduction in the biofilm on the surface. The entire system is controlled by a custom PCB communicating wirelessly with a mobile application to facilitate implementation by researchers and clinicians. This system represents a significant step forward for managing CAUTI using device-based approaches... Read more
Towards Improving the Quality of Electrophysiological Signal Recordings by Using Microneedle Electrode Arrays
This work demonstrates a microneedle electrode array (MEA) for high-quality electrophysiological signal recordings. The microneedles with proper length on the MEA can penetrate through the corneum and reach the epidermis of subjects, which could avoid the influence of corneum and fix the electrode on the body surface for high-quality signal recording especially during body movements. Compared with commonly used dry electrodes, the MEA has lower and more stable interface impedance and can acquire different bioelectric signals (EMG and ECG) with significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio. Besides, there was no report about any discomfort like bleeding or inflammation by all the subjects... Read more
Implementation of a Skull-Conformal Phased Array for Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Therapy
This work aims to improve on the patient comfort and reduce the reliance on intraoperative magnetic resonance image (MRI) guidance for transcranial focused ultrasound therapy. We present a technique for the automated design of a scaffold to house re-usable ultrasound transducers. The scaffold can be optimised for patient-specific brain targets and to conform to the patient’s head. We demonstrated the feasibility of our system by way of numerical simulations and in-vivo testing in rodents. Our results demonstrated that the device could achieve focus through the human skull and safely open the blood-brain-barrier. Skull-conformal phased arrays stand to improve patient comfort and have the potential to accelerate the adoption of transcranial FUS therapy by improving access to the technology... Read more
Estimation and validation of cardiac conduction velocity and wavefront reconstruction using epicardial and volumetric data
Cardiac conduction velocity (CV) is an important electrophysiological property that describes the speed and direction of electrical propagation through the heart. Accurate CV measurements provide a valuable quantitative description of electrical propagation that can help identify diseased tissue substrate and stratify patient risk. In this study we explored a range of techniques for estimating epicardial and volumetric CV and validated the performance of the techniques using whole heart image-based computational modeling. The CV estimation techniques implemented in this study (streamlines, triangulation, inverse-gradient) produce accurate, high-resolution CV fields that can be used to study propagation in the heart experimentally and clinically... Read more
Adaptive Control Improves Sclera Force Safety in Robot-Assisted Eye Surgery: A Clinical Study
This work aims to evaluate two variants of an adaptive force control scheme to mitigate the risk of unsafe scleral forces during robot-assisted eye surgery procedures. The robot and its dependencies were set up in an operating room, where we enrolled ten retina fellows and ophthalmology residents into a simulated procedure. The participants were asked to follow phantom retinal vessels using a custom force-sensing instrument, with and without robotic assistance. We demonstrate that the control methods can make the robot autonomously maintain the scleral forces at predetermined safe levels better than freehand manipulations, while the surgeon performs the surgical tasks... Read more