IEEE Transactions on
Biomedical Engineering

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.
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Xiaochuan Pan
Editor-in-chief
Editor-in-chief

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for... Read more

"Xiaochuan Pan is currently Professor of Radiology, Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Committee in Medical Physics, the College, and the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago. He received the BS (1982) and MS (1985) degrees in physics from Beijing University and the Institute of Physics, Science Academy of China and the MS (1988) and PhD (1991) degrees in physics from The University of Chicago. Following post-doc training in medical imaging from 1992-1994 in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Radiology before being promoted to Associate Professor and Professor of Radiology in 2001 and 2006.

Professor Pan’s research centers on physics, algorithms, and engineering underpinning tomographic imaging and its biomedical and clinical applications. He and his laboratory have conducted research on advanced theory and algorithms for conventional and spectral computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT), and tomosynthesis especially digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital lung tomosynthesis (DLT). In collaborating with leading researchers in the field, he and his team have worked on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have also investigated emerging imaging techniques, including electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), phase-contrast CT, and photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), among others. In recent years, he and his team have developed vigorous interest/effort in translating theoretical concepts and methods to biomedical application work that includes developing innovative hardware systems and workflows, enabled by advanced algorithms, with a strong emphasis on the relevance and impact of imaging technological solutions tailored to specific applications of biomedical and/or clinical significance, and have established continuous, close clinical and industrial collaboration and developed robust translational projects to facilitate this effort. Dr. Pan is a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE."

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Featured Articles

IEEE Transactions on

Biomedical Engineering

OCTOBER 2020
VOLUME 67
NUMBER 10
IEBEAX
67
TBME, Volume 67, Issue 10, October 2020
High-Resolution Dynamic 31P-MR Spectroscopic Imaging for Mapping Mitochondrial Function
Abnormal mitochondrial metabolism is a hallmark of many prevalent diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease; however, current understanding of mitochondrial function is mostly gained from studies on isolated mitochondria under nonphysiological conditions. This work presents a novel high-resolution dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging method that synergistically integrates physics-based models of spectral structures, biochemical modeling of molecular dynamics, and subspace learning, for metabolic mapping at high-spatiotemporal resolution. It enables in vivo imaging of phosphocreatine resynthesis rates, a well-established index of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, thus providing a powerful tool for longitudinal assessment of mitochondrial function in disease progression... Read more
Robust Collaborative Clustering of Subjects and Radiomic Features for Cancer Prognosis
A robust collaborative clustering method has been developed in a Bayesian framework to simultaneously cluster patients and imaging features into distinct groups respectively, aiming to learn a compact set of discriminative features in radiomics studies. Experiments on synthetic data have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach in data clustering, and evaluation results on an FDG-PET/CT dataset of rectal cancer patients have demonstrated that the proposed method outperforms alternative methods in terms of both patient stratification and prediction of patient clinical outcomes... Read more
An Integrated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Neuroablation: Preclinical Evaluation
This paper present preclinical trials of a robotic system for needle-based therapeutic ultrasound (NBTU) ablation of brain tumors under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system comprises of robotic manipulator and corresponding control electronics, the NBTU ablation system and applications for planning, navigation, and monitoring of the system. The integrated robotic system can place NBTU ablator at a desired target location in porcine brain and monitor the ablation in real-time via magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI). The robotic system had a mean translational and rotational accuracy of 3.13±1.41 mm and 5.58±3.59° in 10 porcine trials... Read more
The impact of ACL laxity on a bicondylar robotic knee and implications in human joint biomechanics
A robot model of the human knee provides a new way to investigate joint biomechanics. The specially designed joint has geometry copied from human bones scans and uses springs for ligaments. A knee cap (patella) and tendons transmit forces from an antagonistic pair of actuators, like in the human leg. This method overcomes many of the experimental limitations from using human tissue. The robot demonstrates the unique way in which the sliding of the joint surfaces allows the human knee mechanism to compensate when critical structures such as the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are removed... Read more
Target Flow-Pressure Operating Range for Designing a Failing Fontan Cavopulmonary Support Device
The Fontan procedure has enabled the survival of single ventricle patients into adulthood and reduced early morbidity. However, the lack of a sub-pulmonary ventricle to pump blood flow forward into the lungs have led to serious late complications, including a failing circulation. Using computational modeling of hemodynamics, this study aims to elucidate the hydraulic operating regions to be targeted for designing a cavopulmonary pump that can support Fontan patients with failing circulations. These operating regions also provide criteria for evaluating the off-label use of commercially available blood pumps for Fontan cavopulmonary support... Read more