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Design, Fabrication and Experimental Validation of Novel Flexible Silicon-based Dry Sensors for Electroencephalography Signal Measurements

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(A) Length and width of the forehead-SBDS electrode are 15 mm in each dimension. Five electrodes are embedded in the forehead-SBDS substrate. (B) Thickness of the forehead-SBDS substrate is approximately 0.8~1 mm. (C) Dimensions of the acicular-SBDS.
(A) Length and width of the forehead-SBDS electrode are 15 mm in each dimension. Five electrodes are embedded in the forehead-SBDS substrate. (B) Thickness of the forehead-SBDS substrate is approximately 0.8~1 mm. (C) Dimensions of the acicular-SBDS.

Many electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, including conventional wet and dry sensors, use materials that can cause skin irritation and discomfort. To overcome this drawback, this study reports on the design and human testing of a SGS-certified, silicon-based dry-contact EEG sensor. In addition to being non-irritating, the acicular sensors are lightweight, flexible, and capable of easily fitting to the scalp, forehead, or hairy sites without any skin preparation or conductive gel. The sensors also maintain low skin-electrode interface impedance. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed sensors perform well in EEG measurements and are feasible for both medical and entertainment applications.
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Editorial Comments

On recent paper of Yi-Shin Yu et al., It is quite obvious that the author as well as the reviewer(s) are confusing “silicon” as “silicone”, throughout the entire session of this paper. As is known well, “silicon” (Si26) is an atomic substance at mid of the periodic table and brother of carbon and germanium, basic material of semiconductor which supports entire human informatics world now, while “silicone” is an alias of (poly)alchylsiloxian, typically known such as “silicone-oil” and/or “silicone-rubber”, where (poly)olefin family materials are reconstructed by substituting carbon (C12) with silicon (Si26). Si as single crystal is a light but hard, diamond-like material which can make even a knife, silicone could be staffed as a soft (in some case very soft like animal soft tissue). Yu in his paper obviously speaks and uses a special, conductivity gifted silicone rubber as soft, deformable skin-electrode to obtain certain (but somewhat well known) affordable result. The issue, or rather a problem, is not the essential content of his paper but his (or the all-of-authors’) confusion in terminology, however, more problematic is that the reviewer(s) of this paper for acceptance for JTEHM publication ALSO repeated this confusion, or couldn’t point-out that confusion at all. Here I would like to recommend to the editor and author to once withdraw this paper and resubmit it using correct terminology throughout the paper including the title. It is not an issue of typological errata later to be corrected just with one line “errata” comment but an issue essentially stress the dignity of JTEHM. Here I would ask editor a brave but important decision.
The “silicone and silicone” issues are explained here:

Yasuhito Takeuchi, PhD, Visiting Professor, Department of Renal and Urologic Surgery, Asahikawa Medical University. y.takeuchi@ieee.org

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