Omer T. Inan

Omer T. Inan (S’06, M’09, SM’15) received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 2004, 2005, and 2009, respectively. He joined ALZA Corporation (A Johnson and Johnson Company) in 2006, where he designed micropower circuits for iontophoretic drug delivery. In 2007, he joined Countryman Associates, Inc., Menlo Park, CA where he was Chief Engineer, involved in designing and developing high-end professional audio circuits and systems. From 2009-2013, he was also a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University. Since 2013, Dr. Inan is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. His research focuses on non-invasive physiologic monitoring for human health and performance, and applying novel sensing systems to chronic disease management, acute musculoskeletal injury recovery, and pediatric care. Dr. Inan is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, Associate Editor for the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference and the IEEE Biomedical and Health Informatics Conference, Invited Member of the IEEE Technical Committee on Translational Engineering for Healthcare Innovation, and Technical Program Committee Member or Track Chair for several other major international biomedical engineering conferences. He has published more than 65 technical articles in peer-reviewed international journals and conferences, and has four issued and four pending patents. Dr. Inan received the Gerald J. Lieberman Fellowship (Stanford University) in 2008-'09 for outstanding scholarship, and the Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award (Georgia Tech) in 2016.

Associated articles

TBME, Featured Articles
Towards Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice
Ubiquitous blood pressure monitoring is on the horizon for two reasons. One reason is a profound need. Hypertension is a major cardiovascular risk factor that is treatable, yet high blood pressure detection and control rates are abysmally low, especially in... Read more
TBME, Featured Articles
Ballistocardiogram-Based Approach to Cuff-Less Blood Pressure Monitoring: Proof-of-Concept and Potential Challenges
The goal of this study was to propose and establish the proof-of-concept of an ultra-convenient cuffless blood pressure (BP) monitoring approach based on the ballistocardiogram (BCG).  The proposed approach monitors systolic and diastolic BP (SP and DP) independently by exploiting... Read more
TBME, Featured Articles
Novel Methods for Sensing Acoustical Emissions from the Knee for Wearable Joint Health Assessment
Caitlin N. Teague, Sinan Hersek, Hakan Töreyin, Mindy L. Millard-Stafford, Michael L. Jones, Geza F. Kogler, Michael N. Sawka, and Omer T. Inan, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA The research reported in this paper was highlighted in several major news pieces including Scientific American and BBC Radio. We... Read more
TBME, Featured Articles
A Novel System Identification Technique for Improved Wearable Hemodynamics Assessment
Andrew D. Wiens and Omer T. Inan,  Georgia Institute of Technology Volume 62, Issue 5, Page: 1345-1354 Ballistocardiography (BCG) – the measurement of cardiac function from small movements of the body that occur with the beating heart – has received increasing attention in... Read more
JTEHM, Articles, Published Articles
Elucidating the Hemodynamic Origin of Ballistocardiographic Forces: Towards Improved Monitoring of Cardiovascular Health at Home
The ballistocardiogram (BCG), a signal describing the reaction forces of the body to cardiac ejection of blood, has recently gained interest in the research community as a potential tool for monitoring the mechanical aspects of cardiovascular health for patients at... Read more
JTEHM, Articles, Published Articles
A Wearable System For Attenuating Essential Tremor Based On Peripheral Nerve Stimulation
Currently available treatments for kinetic tremor can cause intolerable side effects or be highly invasive and expensive. Even though several studies have shown the positive effects of external feedback (i.e., electrical stimulation) for suppressing tremor, such approaches have not been... Read more