IEEE PULSE
Feature

Feature September/October 2020
Developing Antibody Defenses
Long before the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began, four research groups—two at universities and two at biotechnology companies—were preparing for it by tackling a seemingly outlandish challenge proffered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Department of Defense: find a stopgap defense against emerging pathogens, so people would have protection until a longer-term solution, notably a vaccine, became available... Read more
Feature September/October 2020
From Face-to-Face to FaceTime
In a Jetsons episode from 60 years ago, Elroy, the youngest Jetson, tries to get out of taking a space calculus test at school by telling his mom he’s sick. “I think I have Venus Virus,” he says. His mom doubts him, but summons a doctor anyway... Read more
Feature September/October 2020
Tracking Sleep to Optimize Health
With the advent of wearable biometrictechnology like smart watches, “hacking” our bodies’ functions and cycles has become a tool in the never-ending quest for better health. And sleep is no exception. For example, a staggering one-third of Americans don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)... Read more
Feature September/October 2020
Rural Health Care for Coronavirus Requires Collaboration, Creativity
Before the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) started sweeping across the United States, it began on the coasts. The first known case was reported in a county just outside of Seattle, WA, with other cases quickly cropping up in California and in the greater New York City region... Read more
Feature September/October 2020
In a Pandemic, Technology Has Its Limits
If there’s one thing made abundantly clear as the pandemic rages on, it’s this: Technology alone can’t save us... Read more
Feature September/October 2020
IoMT (Internet of Medical Things): Reducing Cost While Improving Patient Care
Citizens’ dissatisfaction with the scope of the United States health care system has been a hot topic for many years. In a country where patient to nurse ratios remain 6:1, even universal health care coverage cannot guarantee adequate patient care... Read more
Feature July/August 2020
Managing Weight With Technology
More than 30% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. That is double the percentage in 1980, and it is getting worse [1]. That excess weight has been linked to numerous health conditions, notably type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes, the prevalence of which has also nearly doubled since 1980 [2]. Eating less and exercising more is good advice, but it doesn’t work for everyone. Other options such as gastric bypass surgeries and systemic weight-loss drugs are also not suitable for everyone, and can carry risks of their own... Read more
Feature July/August 2020
AI-Driven COVID-19 Tools to Interpret, Quantify Lung Images
Qualitative interpretation is a good thing when it comes to reading lung images in the fight against coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19), but quantitative analysis makes radiology reporting much more comprehensive. To that end, several research groups have begun looking to artificial intelligence (AI) as a tool for reading and analyzing X-rays and computed tomography (CT) scans, and helping to diagnose and monitor COVID-19... Read more
Feature July/August 2020
Tracking COVID-19: There’s an App for That
In march 2020, before COVID-19 laid claim to the United States, Vice President Mike Pence briefed the press about the coronavirus outbreak, which at the time was a threat to passengers aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship moored off the coast of California [1]. At the time, cases had spiked in Iran, Italy, and Spain, but the disease was still an abstraction to most Americans... Read more
Feature July/August 2020
The Future of Wound Care
Wounds, especially chronic wounds, represent a significant clinical, social, and economic challenge. A recent retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries in the United States identified that about 8.2 million people had at least one type of wound, with surgical wounds and diabetic ulcers among the most common and expensive to treat... Read more